All-Energy & Dcarbonise 2020 Webinar Series Review

All-Energy & Dcarbonise 2020 Webinar Series Review

26 webinars and counting!

Countless Insights on Delivering Net Zero

We created the All-Energy and Dcarbonise webinar series with one thing in mind: supporting the renewable and low carbon energy community during a time of unprecedented challenge. We launched the webinar series with four webinars on what would have been the original dates of the All-Energy & Dcarbonise 2020 event – the 13 and 14 May. We rapidly found the level of support and participation was outstanding.

Capitalising on that success, we now host monthly webinars on the hottest low carbon and renewables topics, including offshore and onshore wind, hydrogen, inclusive transition, community and local energy, solar energy and more. We ramped up the volume in November by holding the All-Energy & Dcarbonise Virtual Summit, which comprised eight webinars over three days, with stellar speakers including Rt Hon Nicola Sturgeon MSP and Paul Wheelhouse MSP.

Click below to view the full series overview and tune in to our sessions on-demand.

Offshore wind: Keeping our eye on the long term prize

Offshore wind: Keeping our eye on the long term prize
Our industry is a critical part of our UK and global response to climate change. The UK is a world leader in offshore wind, and we are seeing rapid expansion across the globe. But in the midst of a global pandemic, how does our industry prioritise and stay on the path to low carbon growth. We bring together leading figures from across our industry to talk about the continued opportunity for offshore wind and reflect on what our changed environment means for our businesses.
 
Chair: Maf Smith, Director, Lumen Energy & Environment
 
Panelists:
● Jonathan Cole, Managing Director, Iberdrola Global Offshore Wind Business
● Mary Thorogood, Senior Specialist, Strategy, Business Development and Government Relations, MHI Vestas Offshore Wind
● Benj Sykes, Vice President, UK Offshore. Head of UK Market Development, Consenting & External Affairs, Ørsted and Industry Chair, OWIC
● Christina Horspool, Environment Division Manager, Xodus Group
● Morris Bray, Senior Business Development Manager, National Grid Ventures.
 
Panel Q&A
 

Speakers

Maf Smith
Maf Smith
Director, Lumen Energy & Environment

Maf Smith is the founding director of specialist consultancy Lumen Energy & Environment. He is an expert in energy transition, with a 20+ year leadership career in the renewable sector.

Between 2012 and 2019 Maf was the Deputy CEO of RenewableUK. In this time he was chief spokesperson, represented industry at all levels of Government, and managed the Association’s membership and commercial growth. Prior to this Maf worked in DECC on Electricity Market Reform, was Director of Scotland for the Sustainable Development Commission between 2006 and 2011, and CEO of Scottish Renewables between 2002 and 2006.

Jonathan Cole
Jonathan Cole
Managing Director, Iberdrola Global Offshore Wind Business

Jonathan is based in the UK and runs the Offshore Wind Business of Iberdrola Renewables (ScottishPower Renewables in the UK).

Under Jonathan’s leadership, Iberdrola’s Offshore Wind Business has grown from its inception in 2011 to a business with €6Bn under investment and more than 300 professional staff.

Jonathan is responsible for the development, construction and operation of a large international pipeline of projects, including 3,500MW of Projects off the East Anglian coast, >1,000MW of projects in Germany, 500MW in France and >5,000MW in the US.

Jonathan also sits as Chairman/Director of a number of industry bodies, including the UK Government’s Offshore Wind Programme Board, the Global Offshore Wind Health & Safety Organisation and the Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult’s Industry Advisory Group. 

Mary Thorogood
Mary Thorogood
Senior Specialist, Strategy, Business Development and Government Relations, MHI Vestas Offshore Wind

Mary leads MHI Vestas’ Government Relations and policy team, ensuring policy frameworks and the political environment work together to deliver sustainable, long term growth in offshore wind markets around the world.   Mary joined MHI Vestas from Vattenfall, the state-owned Swedish utility and one of the world’s largest offshore wind developers.  Mary has strong experience of the UK CfD and wider offshore wind space as it has evolved and grown, working with Government and wider stakeholders to ensure offshore wind delivers low cost power to UK businesses and communities.  Mary also played a key role with the UK industry and Government in delivering the Offshore Wind Sector Deal

Benj Sykes
Benj Sykes, Vice President, UK Offshore, Head of UK Market Development, Consenting & External Affairs, Orsted and Industry Chair, OWIC

Benj is Head of Market Development, Consenting and Public Affairs in the UK offshore wind business of Ørsted and is responsible for business growth, setting and delivering the company’s sustainability and environmental agendas, and managing Ørsted’s relationships across government, authorities and NGOs. 

He is Chair of the Offshore Wind Industry Council and led the work to agree a Sector Deal with  Government; he also serves on the Board of G+, providing Health and Safety leadership for the offshore wind sector.  He is a member of the government-appointed Advisory Panel on Highly Protected Marine Areas.

Benj previously worked in the upstream oil and gas industry.

Christina Horspool
Christina Horspool
Environment Division Manager, Xodus Group

As Environment Manager at Xodus Group, Christina Horspool is a proactive, innovative and inspiring business leader in the areas of climate change, energy efficiency, decarbonisation and sustainability. Christina’s experience across the energy sector, including offshore wind and oil and gas, as well as her technical background in atmospheric emissions, carbon accounting and carbon lifecycle, allows her to lead the 60-strong team of environmental and marine specialists across the UK.

The Xodus vision is that ‘together, we will deliver a responsible energy future’.  Christina is proactively reinforcing the company vision through her engagement across industry including various Oil and Gas UK forums around decarbonisation and energy transition; and through the Scottish Government-backed Future Industry Leaders Programme. Christina’s proactive approach to people development and innovation across the energy sector, as well as her underlying objective for sustainability and efficiency, has paved the way for a well-motivated, engaged, multi-skilled team of consultants all working to deliver clean energy alongside sustainable economic growth. Most recently, Christina has been a core part of Xodus Group’s aim to help the UK energy sector deliver beyond its net zero ambitions through innovative technologies, processes and techniques.

Christina sees offshore wind as a critical part of the UK’s response to climate change and is passionate about leveraging the cross-sector opportunities offered through the UK’s long track record in offshore energy and infrastructure projects; whether these be associated with offshore wind helping to decarbonise oil and gas activity, or helping supply chain or the workforce prepare for the next phase of major growth in offshore wind.

If you need any further information do give me a shout. My mobile is on my signature so feel free to give me a call on there.

Morris Bray
Morris Bray
Senior Business Development Manager, National Grid Ventures

Morris is a Senior Business Development Manager for National Grid Ventures, leading new HVDC developments between GB and other countries in the North Sea region. He has experience of HVDC interconnector project development, having led National Grid’s team in the development phase of the IFA2 interconnector between GB and France along with RTE, and advocates the transition to a North Sea grid through multi-purpose interconnectors that combine the benefits of connecting markets with benefits of providing offshore connections for offshore wind.  Morris is a member of the European Commission Expert Group on Interconnection Targets.

Improving Energy Resilience Using Multi-Energy Systems

Improving Energy Resilience Using Multi-Energy Systems

Key Highlights

  • Multi-energy systems (MES) offer a comprehensive approach to decarbonisation by integrating diverse energy sources and technologies, boosting efficiency, and minimising emissions across various sectors, from urban communities to industrial facilities. 
  • Practical examples of MES in action worldwide include Masdar City in the UAE, the Zero Emission Building in Vancouver, Canada, and the Neste oil refinery in Porvoo, Finland. 
  • Innovative solutions, like the Energy Web Decentralized Operating System, are revolutionising data exchange in the energy sector by promoting automated energy trading, enhancing efficiency, transparency, and decentralisation in energy markets. 
  • Coordinated efforts are essential to accelerate the transition to renewable-centric MES. Government-enacted policies, investment in infrastructure, and continued research are vital for driving advancements in MES technologies and fostering sustainable energy systems. 

 

The European energy sector stands at a pivotal moment. The region's 2050 decarbonisation goals demand drastic cuts to carbon emissions, prompting innovation towards cleaner and more sustainable solutions. In this landscape, multi-energy systems (MESs) emerge as powerful tools, offering a holistic approach to decarbonisation. 

Understanding Multi-Energy Systems

Multi-energy systems, at their essence, represent integrated networks that leverage a diverse array of energy sources and technologies. By combining energy sources, storage, and smart grid technologies, MES provides a versatile framework for optimising energy production, distribution, and consumption.  

Efficiency: Co-generation plants, a cornerstone of MES, extract multiple forms of usable energy (electricity and heat) from a single source. This eliminates waste heat, which is a major issue in traditional power generation, boosting efficiency and minimising emissions.   

Renewable Integration: MES allow the seamless integration of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Energy storage solutions, another key component, capture this intermittent energy, storing it for later use when demand is high, or supply is low. 

Decarbonisation Potential Beyond Electricity: Heating and cooling systems are often significant sources of emissions, and MES help optimise these through technologies like efficient district heating networks and geothermal energy storage. 

Join Dcarbonise 2024 in Shaping a Sustainable Future

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MES in Action: Practical Applications Worldwide

Multi-energy systems (MES) are gaining traction globally as they offer increased efficiency, flexibility, and sustainability compared to traditional, siloed energy approaches. Here are some real-world examples showcasing their diverse applications:

Masdar City, UAE 

Masdar City is a pioneering sustainable urban community. This district-level eco-city integrates solar, wind, and natural gas power generation with district heating and cooling networks, optimising energy use and minimising environmental impact. 

Zero Emission Building, Vancouver, Canada 

Canada’s Zero Emission Building is a forward-thinking initiative by the City of Vancouver, aimed at promoting sustainable building practices and reducing carbon emissions from the built environment. The ZEB standard set by the city outlines a phased approach to ensure that new constructions in Vancouver achieve net-zero emissions. 

Neste oil refinery, Porvoo, Finland 

The Neste oil refinery in Porvoo, Finland, is a prime example of how multi-energy systems can be applied for decarbonisation in the industrial sector. The refinery reduces its carbon footprint and improves energy efficiency by producing of renewable fuels such as renewable diesel and sustainable aviation fuel, co-generation facilities for combined heat and power, waste heat recovery, integrating renewable energy sources, and exploring carbon capture and utilisation technologies. 

Energy Web Decentralised Oracle (EWDO) 

The energy web decentralised oracle (EWDO) is a blockchain-based platform designed to revolutionise data exchange in the energy sector. It acts as a bridge between data providers (e.g., renewable energy producers, weather stations) and data consumers (e.g., energy traders, grid operators). This empowers automated energy trading based on predefined conditions, boosting efficiency and transparency while promoting a fairer and more decentralised market. 

Driving the Transition to Renewable-Centric MESs 

The adoption of multi-energy systems is a significant move towards a renewable-centric energy future.  Coordinated efforts across various fronts are necessary for the success of this transition: 

Policy Support: Governments must enact supportive policies and provide incentives to accelerate the deployment of multi-energy systems. This includes feed-in tariffs, tax incentives, and renewable energy mandates that stimulate investment and innovation in the renewable energy sector. 

Investment in Infrastructure and Technology: Strategic investments in infrastructure, such as upgrading existing grid infrastructure and expanding renewable energy capacity, are crucial for scaling up MES and maximising their potential benefits. 

Research and Innovation: Continued research and innovation are also critical for driving advancements in MES technologies, improving system efficiency, and overcoming technical challenges. Collaborative efforts between industry stakeholders, research institutions, and policymakers can foster knowledge sharing and facilitate the development of best practices for MES integration. 

Join the low-carbon industry this May 15th-16th, 2024, in Glasgow at All-Energy & Dcarbonise

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REGISTRATION OPENS FOR ALL-ENERGY AND DCARBONISE 2024

REGISTRATION OPENS FOR ALL-ENERGY AND DCARBONISE 2024

Registration for All-Energy, the UK’s largest renewable and low carbon exhibition and conference, and the co-located Dcarbonise is now open at www.all-energy.co.uk/24. All elements of the two-day event running at Glasgow’s SEC on 15 and 16 May (major exhibition, multi-streamed conference and Civic Reception and Giant Networking Evening) are free to attend for those with relevant business or academic interests. The 2023 edition of the annual series attracted total attendance of 9,706 – a 27% increase on the 2022 figure.

“Politicians, industry leaders, working engineers and academic specialists abound in the stellar line-up of some 600+ speakers over the two days. All are working towards a single target – engineering a net zero future,” explained Jonathan Heastie, Portfolio Director Energy & Marine, RX Global, who own and organise the duo of co-located events.

“They range from Scotland’s First Minister, Humza Yousaf, and Energy Minister, Gillian Martin (making a welcome return to the event at which they both spoke soon after the First Minister’s appointment last year) to a wide range of experts. These include Professor Jim Skea, Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); Louise Kingham CBE, FEI, Senior Vice President, Europe and Head of Country at bp, Emma Pinchbeck, Chief Executive, Energy UK and Darren Davidson, Vice President of Siemens Energy UK&I and Siemens Gamesa UK amongst speakers in our two opening plenary sessions.

“In response to many requests, we will be devoting more time to the grid with five conference sessions in a dedicated room – the session topics can be seen on our outline programme at www.all-energy.co.uk/24 Excitingly, we will also be hosting a lunchtime ‘fireside chat’ on 16 May between two Knights who have helped shape the energy industry, Professor Sir Jim McDonald and Sir Ian Wood,

“As ever our duo of events encompasses topics ranging from offshore wind (and all other forms of renewable energy, with tidal range having a full session for the first time), hydrogen and energy storage to the decarbonisation of the built environment, heat; cities/places, and to transport – with HGVs and Energy Infrastructure in the conference spotlight - and so much more ranging from finance and funding to community benefit, PPAs to future talent..

“Our headline sponsor Shepherd and Wedderburn, celebrating their 10th sponsoring year with us, is bringing together sessions on ‘Delivering our offshore wind ambitions’ to ‘Maps, money and multiple benefits: City scale decarbonisation’; a session on ports to ‘Innovation in Clean Tech: How are we shaping the future?’ which demonstrates their (and our) wide range of interests – all. of course, with line-ups of luminaries.”

The full programme for the multi-session main conference and the nine show floor theatres will be published in the first half of March,

Turning his attention to the exhibition, Jonathan Heastie explained: “Our exhibitor list already resembles a ‘who’s who’, and A-Z of organisations from throughout the sectors we serve including ABB, Centrica Energy, Clarke Energy, Ecotricity,  EDF Energy, Enercon, GE Renewable Energy, Invest Northern Ireland, Muirhall Energy, Natural Power, Parat Halvorsen, Ripple Energy, Siemens Energy/Siemens Gamesa, SmartestEnergy, Statkraft UK, SSE, Xodus, ZX Lidars. Recent additions include Business France, Czech Trade and the HY5 -The Green Hydrogen Initiative of Northern Germany who join individual exhibitors from Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands and Norway, as well as throughout the UK.

Full information for potential exhibitors is at www.all-energy.co.uk/24 All-Energy takes pride in being the UK’s largest low carbon energy and full supply chain renewables event; while Dcarbonise is aimed at private and public sector energy end users.

Networking is key

“Visiting exhibition stands to see the latest innovative solutions; and the conference to learn, figure highly on the aims of our visitors, and so too does networking,” explained Jonathan Heastie. “This year our Giant Networking Evening, sponsored by Siemens Energy, and Siemens Gamesa, will once again be held at the Glasgow Science Centre where the hundreds of interactive exhibits help to provide an enjoyable and relaxed atmosphere to ensure productive networking. We are grateful to the Rt Hon Lord Provost of Glasgow for the Civic Reception that forms part of the vital networking experience.”

Three Trailblazing Solar Projects in the UK

Three Trailblazing Solar Projects in the UK

Key Highlights

  • Solar power capacity in the UK is anticipated to reach 15 GW by 2023. The prediction forecasts 43 GW by 2028, a three-quarters growth, or 23.53% CAGR.
  • Metris Energy, an AI-powered solar energy platform, has received £2 million to revolutionise how property owners communicate with, install, and profit from solar energy solutions.
  • British Solar Renewables (BSR), an integrated solar developer, filed revised designs for the 20 MW Akeman Solar Park in West Oxfordshire and the 19 MW Dengie Solar Park in Essex.
  • Oxford PV and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems broke the solar panel conversion efficiency record at 25%, significantly higher than the normal 24% in commercial modules.

 

As the world shifts towards sustainable practices, solar initiatives stand as one of the foundations of innovation. With that, the United Kingdom’s solar energy market has expanded at an astounding pace. As of 2023, the installed capacity of solar power in the UK is estimated to be 15 gigawatts (GW). This forecast is expected to increase by approximately three-quarters, or 23.53% compound annual rate (CAGR), to reach 43 GW by 2028. 

Every project, ranging from rooftop installations to expansive solar farms, exemplifies the capacity of solar energy to promote energy independence and conservation of the environment. 

Here are three solar initiatives that will make a substantial impact on the current energy landscape in the UK: 

1. Metris Energy lands £2M funding for AI-backed solar platform 

With the aim of revolutionising the way property owners interact with, implement, and profit from solar energy solutions, Metris Energy, an AI-powered solar energy platform, has effectively obtained £2 million in funding. To support the company's development of its AI-powered photovoltaic platform and capitalise on a projected £22 billion revenue opportunity in the commercial property sector, Octopus Ventures and Aenu VC led the pre-seed funding round. 

Metris facilitates the solar investment process for proprietors by providing comprehensive support, encompassing initial evaluation, installation, and continuous energy administration. The platform efficiently computes financial gains from solar energy adoption and generates portfolio assessments using AI technology. By digitising and automating contracts, it substantially mitigates the administrative burdens that are typically associated with selling solar energy to tenants. 

As per Metris co-founder Natasha Jones, “With Metris’ AI-powered platform, commercial property owners can easily leverage unused roof space to generate extra revenue and play a crucial part in securing a greener, more prosperous future for the planet.” 

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2. British Solar Renewables (BSR) submits revised plans for dual solar farms development 

Revised proposals for the 20 MW Akeman Solar Park in West Oxfordshire and the 19 MW Dengie Solar Park in Essex have been submitted by British Solar Renewables (BSR), an integrated solar developer. 

The development section of BSR Energy has changed its Akeman Solar Park project plans based on 2021 public consultation results. Despite the fact that the redesigned design reduces solar panels by 2,900, a 10% decrease, the solar park ensures that it can export 20 MW to the National Grid per technology and panel production criteria. The project will create 20,000 MWh of renewable power annually, promoting sustainable energy. 

On the other hand, due to Maldon Council comments, BSR's plans for the 33-hectare Dengie Solar Park in Maldon District have also been modified. These improvements include the Flood Risk Assessment, Outline Drainage Strategy, Sequential Test, Farmland Bird Mitigation Strategy, Landscape and Visual Assessment, General Arrangement Plan, and Softworks Plan. 

3. Oxford PV and Fraunhofer Institute break the solar efficiency record 

With a conversion efficiency of 25%—far higher than the typical 24% seen in commercial modules—Oxford PV and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems have accomplished a remarkable feat by smashing the previous record for solar panels. Renowned for its achievements in next-generation solar technology, namely in perovskite-on-silicon tandem solar cells, Oxford PV is a spin-out of the University of Oxford. Compared to conventional silicon solar cells, whose highest efficiency is less than 30%, these cells are theoretically capable of achieving efficiencies of over 43%. 

The CEO of Oxford PV, David Ward, highlighted the importance of this accomplishment, saying that it might completely transform solar technology in the year 2024. To get their groundbreaking technology into people's homes, he detailed plans to ship panels that are ready for sale from their German facility and to increase production worldwide. 

UK's solar projects in the renewable revolution 

The solar projects in the UK are leading the charge to become a renewable energy leader, and they are sparking a revolutionary transformation. These programmes support the country's commitments to sustainability through their community-based and innovative designs. 

The integration of solar panels into power grids and the subsequent output of renewable energy signifies the onset of a paradigm shift—one propelled by the boundless luminosity of the sun. The UK advances towards its renewable energy objectives with every kilowatt-hour produced, thereby emphasising the vision and resolve of its solar initiatives that will contribute to a more sustainable future. 

Mark your calendars and join us on May 15th-16th, 2024, in Glasgow as we unlock the potential of renewable and low carbon energy at All-Energy & Dcarbonise

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All-Energy 2024 applauds 10 years of Shepherd and Wedderburn sponsorship

All-Energy 2024 applauds 10 years of Shepherd and Wedderburn sponsorship

    Extension to show floor theatre call for speakers
    Increasing number of overseas exhibitors welcomed

Shepherd and Wedderburn will once again be Headline Sponsor of All-Energy 2024 and the co-located Dcarbonise (Glasgow’s SEC,15-16 May 2024) with full involvement in both the conference and exhibition at the UK’s largest renewable and low carbon energy exhibition and conference.

“We are delighted to celebrate 10 years of sponsorship by Shepherd and Wedderburn and look forward to working with them once again as Headline Sponsor, particularly on plans for the offshore wind, and decarbonisation of cities/places conference streams where they ensure topicality and with stellar line-ups, attract large audiences,” said Jonathan Heastie, Portfolio Director, Energy & Marine at RX who own and organise the duo of events.

“The Shepherd and Wedderburn Clean Energy Team, headed by Clare Foster, brings its immense knowledge to the show in general and to the conference in particular. They are also enthusiastic and proactive exhibitors - we thoroughly enjoy working with them.

Clare Foster, Head of Clean Energy, banking Partner, and lead for the Edinburgh Climate Change Compact explained: “2024 is a fantastic milestone as it will mark the 10th anniversary of Shepherd and Wedderburn as Headline Sponsor for the All-Energy conference.

“In that time, we have seen remarkable growth and innovation in the clean energy and decarbonisation arenas and the conference continues to challenge us and all those working in this sector to try harder and do better. We are delighted to continue our support to the UK’s largest low-carbon energy and decarbonisation event and look forward to celebrating this milestone at the conference in May!”

Show floor theatre call for speakers extended

The call for speakers for the popular show floor theatres at All-Energy and Dcarbonise has been extended until 28 February. These cover offshore wind, marine renewables, hydrogen and energy storage, community and local energy, future talent, heat decarbonisation, built environment decarbonisation, transport decarbonisation, and innovation across the board.

A ninth show floor theatre in the Research and Innovation Hub, an Energy Technology Partnership (ETP) initiative, brings academic and industrial collaboration projects together focussing in the theatre on the work undertaken on projects displayed on small pods within the Hub.

Increase in overseas involvement

The show is also celebrating the commitment by a growing number of overseas exhibitors as January has seen an influx of overseas groups and individual companies joining the ever-growing register of exhibitors. Recent additions include Business France and the HY5 -The Green Hydrogen Initiative of Northern Germany who join individual exhibitors from Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands and Norway, as well as throughout the UK.

“We are also delighted that Invest Northern Ireland will make a return visit across the Irish Sea with an increasing number of exhibitors,” said Jonathan Heastie.

Under a month to wait before free registration opens

Registration for the duo of events will open on 20 February for visitors who can visit the exhibition and attend the conference and Civic Reception and Giant Networking Evening (the latter sponsored once again by Siemens Energy and Siemens Gamesa) all free of charge providing they have relevant business or academic interests. Exhibitor and media registration will open on the same day.

Jonathan Heastie looks back to last year’s event: “In 2023 we broke all previous records with a total attendance of 9,706 – a 27% increase on the 2022 figure; and some 9,200 badges were scanned at the entrance to main conference rooms and show floor theatres.

“It was a fantastic two days. The exhibition halls were constantly busy, with the buzz of business being done and successful networking that has always been the hallmark of All-Energy. The conference attracted packed halls right up to the final minutes of our two-day event. The Civic Reception and Giant Networking Evening, and features such as the Future Talent Hub and Meet the Developer all played their part in the success story as they will do again this year, with Glasgow firmly in the spotlight hosting the Glasgow Climate Week with All-Energy playing a central role.”

Further information on all aspects of the two-day event is at www.all-energy.co.uk and www.dcarbonise.com

Captions:

  • Clare Foster, Head of Clean Energy at Shepherd and Wedderburn
  • Shepherd and Wedderburn’s stand at the 2023 show

Notes to Editors

All-Energy, the history: 2023 marked All-Energy’s 22nd t Anniversary. The UK’s largest renewable and low carbon energy exhibition and conference has been held since February 2001; the first co-located Dcarbonise was held in 2019 embracing low carbon heat, energy efficiency and low carbon transport (the latter via the Smart Urban Mobility Solutions conference stream). The first 14 All-Energy events were held in Aberdeen; the show moved to Glasgow in 2015. During the COVID pandemic with no ‘in person’ show 42 webinars were staged attracting over 25,000 views.

Further press information is available from: Judith Patten @ JPPR – judithpatten@JPPR.uk.com

Photographs: you can download photographs from www.flickr.com/photos/198987344@N06/ but if you would prefer to just be sent one that suits your particular needs, or a selection, please contact Judith Patten as above

Videos:  At show videos and an interview with the First Minister of Scotland are at https://www.youtube.com/user/AllEnergyConference

Editors – if you would like your publication to be an All-Energy/Dcarbonise 2024 media partner: please contact Tina Abulashvili tina.abulashvili@rxglobal.com

About RX (Reed Exhibitions)

RX is in the business of building businesses for individuals, communities and organisations. We elevate the power of face to face events by combining data and digital products to help customers learn about markets, source products and complete transactions at over 400 events in 22 countries across 423 industry sectors. RX is part of RELX, a global provider of information-based analytics and decision tools for professional and business customers. www.rxglobal.com

About RELX
RELX is a global provider of information-based analytics and decision tools for professional and business customers, enabling them to make better decisions, get better results and be more productive. The Group serves customers in more than 180 countries and has offices in about 40 countries, employing over 30,000 people. www.relx.com

Charging Ahead: The UK’s Electric Vehicle Revolution

Charging Ahead: The UK’s Electric Vehicle Revolution

Key Highlights

  • In May 2019, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) reported that achieving net zero by 2035 or sooner requires electrifying all new automobiles. 
  • The UK government also unveiled its zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) mandate to push EV regulation. 
  • The Transport Decarbonisation Plan seeks to reduce transport carbon emissions by spending £5 billion on alternate alternatives and ceasing the sale of internal combustion engine vehicles by 2030–2035. By 2030 and 2040, the National Highways Net Zero Plan seeks zero emissions from operations, maintenance, and building.  
  • The £1.6 billion Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy intends to make charging electric vehicles easier and cheaper than filling up with fuel or diesel.  
  • A £450 million Local Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (LEVI) plan will assist EV hubs and on-street charging for those without driveways. 
  • The £950 million Rapid Charging Fund will install at least 6,000 high-powered super-fast chargepoints on England's roadways by 2035, maintaining the UK at the forefront of fast public charging. 

 

Change is sweeping the highways of the United Kingdom. Being responsible for 88% of passenger miles and 79% of freight traffic, England's highways are crucial. Aside from that, despite making up just 2% of roads, National Highways' strategic road network (SRN) handles one-third of passenger miles and two-thirds of freight miles in England. Connectivity is crucial for investment, community empowerment, and efficient domestic and international supply chains in the SRN. 

As they glide past their diesel and gasoline-powered competitors, sleek electric cars (EVs) are bringing with them the promise of a more environmentally friendly future. An important strategic change driving the UK's ambitious decarbonisation targets is the recent uptick in the popularity of electric vehicles. 

Policy paves the way

In an effort to speed up the transition to electric vehicles, the UK government has enacted a number of regulations. According to a May 2019 report by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), in order to reach the net zero goal by 2035—or perhaps sooner—all new cars need to be powered by electricity. 

Aside from that, the government also presented its zero emission vehicle (ZEV) mandate, which would advance the country’s regulatory framework for the EV transition. Because of this, by 2030, 80% of new vehicles and 70% of new vans produced in Great Britain will have zero emissions, and by 2035, that number will rise to 100%. As of the end of sales in 2035, the UK will be on par with other big global economies, including Canada, France, Germany, and Sweden. 

By investing £5 billion in alternative alternatives and ending the sale of internal combustion engine cars by 2030–2035, the Transport Decarbonisation Plan, which was launched in 2021, also aims to reduce carbon emissions from transport. Along these lines, the National Highways Net Zero Plan aims to achieve zero emissions from operations by 2030 and from all maintenance and building by 2040. In keeping with larger sustainability objectives in transport, the strategy calls for a leadership position in HGV trials, investment in infrastructure, and assistance for drivers making the switch to zero-emission cars. 

Join Dcarbonise 2024 in Shaping a Sustainable Future

Dcarbonise is Scotland's only exhibition and conference focused on reducing carbon emissions from the built environment and transportation systems. Together, let's redefine the possibilities for a sustainable future.

Call for Papers are Open for All-Energy & Dcarbonise

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Charging up growth

With a target of 300,000 by 2030, the government is investing a lot of money into rapid chargers. 

The Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy, which has £1.6 billion to work with, aims to make charging electric vehicles more convenient and affordable than filling up with petrol or diesel. The new regulations governing operators will also make it possible for EV drivers to pay with contactless cards, compare charging rates, and locate chargepoints in their area using mobile applications. 

UK communities will receive high-quality, affordably priced public chargepoints worth £500 million. To help individuals without driveways use greener transport, a £450 million Local Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (LEVI) initiative will support EV hubs and on-street charging. While LEVI financing includes up to £50 million for personnel to work on local problems and public chargepoint planning, any development must support existing zero-emission modes of travel, including walking and cycling. 

On the other hand, the £950 million Rapid Charging Fund will help implement at least 6,000 high-powered super-fast chargepoints on England's highways by 2035, keeping the UK at the forefront of quick and ultra-rapid public charging. 

A collaborative journey to navigate the future

Electric vehicle (EV) decarbonisation is an ambitious goal that calls for teamwork from everyone involved. Each player—the state, businesses, academic institutions, and individual motorists—must do their part. The UK must maintain its momentum towards net zero emissions through sustained governmental backing, technical improvements, and public awareness initiatives. 

Electric vehicles are bringing about a greener, healthier, and more sustainable future in the United Kingdom, and it's about more than just automobiles. Embracing the promise of electric vehicles can position the UK to lead the world in the decarbonisation race, ensuring a legacy of cleaner air, green employment, and a preserved planet for future generations. 

Join the low carbon industry this May 15th-16th, 2024, in Glasgow at All-Energy & Dcarbonise

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Three Offshore Wind Farms Transforming the Energy Landscape

Three Offshore Wind Farms Transforming the Energy Landscape

Key Highlights

  • The global offshore wind sector will rise 12.3% from 2021 to 2026, from USD 31.8 billion to USD 56.8 billion. 
  • TotalEnergies and PTTEP, Thailand's national oil and gas company, have agreed to sell 25.5% of the Seagreen offshore wind farm off Scotland. The parties' agreement values this sale at £522 million ($689 million). 
  • The Scottish Moray West offshore wind farm project received a £95.5 million Barclays loan, which considerably improved it. Amazon may invest in the Moray West offshore wind farm to power all its UK companies with sustainable energy by next year. 
  • Iberdrola Group member Avangrid plans further on- and offshore wind farm testing in the coming weeks. One turbine supplied 5 MW of power on Tuesday, January 2, 2024, during commissioning. 

 

There has been a proliferation of cutting-edge offshore wind energy projects in recent years. Massive wind farms, frequently located at great distances from land, are changing the face of the energy industry by capturing wind energy and transforming it into sustainable power. 

The offshore wind industry has been booming over the last decade, and it doesn't appear like it will ever slow down. There will be a 12.3% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in the worldwide offshore wind industry from 2021 to 2026, taking it from an anticipated USD 31.8 billion to USD 56.8 billion. 

Here are three offshore wind farms, each leaving a notable imprint on the contemporary energy landscape: 

1. Seagreen Offshore Wind Farm

In operation since 2012, Seagreen boasts 114 turbines with a combined capacity of 1075 MW, making it Scotland's largest offshore wind farm. Along with contributing significantly to Scotland's net-zero goal by 2045*, the wind farms will displace over 2 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-generated energy annually, which is equivalent to reducing almost a third of all yearly vehicle emissions in Scotland. 

Deals have been struck between TotalEnergies and PTTEP, the national oil and gas firm of Thailand, to sell 25.5% of the stock in the Seagreen offshore wind farm off the coast of Scotland. This deal is worth £522 million ($689 million) as per the parties' agreements. 

2. Moray West Offshore Wind Farm 

To ensure a steady and inexpensive supply of electricity for up to 1.33 million households, the UK is in critical need of new generating capacity. The Moray West Offshore Wind Farm is poised to provide this by deploying established technology in an area with a recognised wind resource. 

Being the first UK offshore wind farm to depend on corporate power purchase agreements for commercialization, Moray West Offshore Wind Farm has achieved financial close and obtained £2 billion in non-recourse project funding. The initiative seeks to attain complete power generation by 2025, aligning with the renewable energy goals set by both the United Kingdom and Scotland. 

Barclays extended a loan of £95.5 million to the Moray West offshore wind farm project in Scotland, greatly enhancing the project. Amazon is also aiming to power all of its UK businesses with renewable energy by the following year, and a report suggests that it is planning to invest in the Moray West offshore wind farm to that end. 

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3. Vineyard Wind I

Vineyard Wind I, 15 miles south of Martha's Vineyard and 34 miles south of Cape Cod, generates enough power for over 400,000 Massachusetts homes and businesses with an installed capacity of 806 MW. Some of the world's most powerful wind turbines—62 General Electric Haliade-X 13 MW—are used in it. It will also provide thousands of jobs and power more than 400,000 houses. 

According to Avangrid, a member of the Iberdrola Group, more testing is planned to take place both on and offshore in the following weeks for the wind farm. On Tuesday, 2 January 2024, one turbine supplied around 5 MW of power as part of the initial commissioning phase. 

Navigating the Future of Offshore Wind Energy 

These three most recent offshore wind projects are being explored, and a picture of renewable energy is emerging. Offshore wind energy is a constantly changing landscape, and this voyage around incredible projects highlights that. 

Experience the journey into the future of energy, where efficiency, creativity, and environmental responsibility come together to create a greener, more sustainable future. A more promising and environmentally friendly future is on the horizon, thanks to the winds of change. 

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Sustainable Heat: Charting the Course for Decarbonisation

Sustainable Heat: Charting the Course for Decarbonisation

Key Highlights

  • Because heat accounts for approximately half of the world's energy consumption and 40% of its energy-related carbon emissions, heat decarbonisation is a key impediment to Net Zero. 
  • EU greenhouse gas emissions fell 20% from 1990 levels by 2020. To meet 2030 and beyond commitments, the yearly greenhouse gas emission reduction from 2005 to 2020 must be doubled.  
  • Although focused on climate change, heat decarbonisation offers other benefits. These include job creation and air quality improvement. 
  • West Sussex County Council outlined its heat decarbonisation initiative's first buildings to be modified, advancing its net zero carbon goal. The council may reduce its carbon footprint by replacing fossil fuels with heat pumps in 14 buildings as part of the plan. 

 

One of the major obstacles to achieving Net Zero is heat decarbonisation, and this is because nearly half of the world's energy consumption and 40% of its energy-related carbon emissions come from heat. 

Heating energy is considerable, so decarbonising it is crucial. Back in 2020, the EU reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 20% from 1990 levels. But then, the annual greenhouse gas emission decrease from 2005 to 2020 must be doubled to reach 2030 and beyond targets. Energy efficiency and conservation, combined with rapid conversion to renewable and waste energy use in heating and cooling, decrease climate change and promote supply security; hence, faster implementation is essential. 

Heat Decarbonisation Benefits 

Heat decarbonisation has benefits beyond climate change, despite its environmental focus. Sustainable heating solutions have a positive ripple effect on society and the economy. With that, here are two benefits of heat decarbonisation: 

     Job creation - As heating methods become cleaner, new jobs can be created in the areas of making, installing, and maintaining low-carbon heating systems by 2035. 
    Improved air quality - Air pollution is increased by traditional heating techniques, especially coal and oil. Decarbonising heat reduces particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions, improving air quality and public health. 

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West Sussex County Council Makes Strides Towards Net Zero with Heat Decarbonisation Programme

Projects for heat decarbonisation started, and one of those is West Sussex County Council’s initiative. West Sussex County Council announced the first buildings to be upgraded as part of its ambitious heat decarbonisation initiative, advancing its net zero carbon aim. This countywide initiative promotes sustainable practices and leads by example to reduce public building carbon emissions. 

As part of the initiative, the council will be able to make adjustments to 14 of its buildings, such as replacing fossil fuels with heat pumps, thus lowering its carbon impact. 

Beyond Emissions: The Transformative Power of Heat Decarbonisation

Heat decarbonisation has several uses beyond just lowering emissions of greenhouse gases. This can lead to a more sustainable, rich, and equal future by making the switch to clean heating alternatives. With global cooperation on this initiative, more and more advantages will be available in the future as technology improves and costs decrease.

Join the low carbon industry this May 15th-16th, 2024, in Glasgow at All-Energy & Dcarbonise

COP28 in Dubai: Innovations and Compromises in Climate Talks

COP28 in Dubai: Innovations and Compromises in Climate Talks

(Photo by: Martin Divíšek/EPA)

Key Highlights

  • AI, indoor vertical farms on Mars, solar-powered "responsible" boats, and carbon emission reduction will be discussed at the COP28 climate meeting in Dubai.
  • Sultan al-Jaber, COP28 president, has repeatedly said the summit will "take a new road," do "unprecedented" things, and have a "transformational" impact.
  • The president of the UN climate summit advised ministers and negotiators at COP28's important final sessions to be open to compromise rather than predetermined. The climate talks have stalled over whether to phase out or reduce fossil fuels.
  • Climate Analytics predicts 86bn tonnes of greenhouse gases will be released by 2050 if CCS underperforms, whereas Oxford University estimates that a large buildout and use of this technology will cost $1tn a year.
  • Catherine Abreu, Destination Zero executive director, said that witnessing ministers from around the world debate phasing out fossil fuels was unfathomable two years ago.


The COP28 climate meeting in Dubai is expected to cover a wide range of topics, including artificial intelligence, indoor vertical farms on Mars, solar-powered "responsible" yachts, and methods for removing carbon emissions. Talks, activities, and demonstrations emphasise the need for mankind to innovate to solve the climate catastrophe over the course of two weeks. 

According to COP28 president Sultan al-Jaber, the summit will "take a new road," do "unprecedented" things, and have a "transformational" impact, as he has continuously stated. The head of the UN climate summit has warned that ministers and negotiators attending the crucial final sessions of COP28 should not go into the discussions with predetermined positions or hard boundaries, but rather should be open to compromise. The climate negotiations have hit a stalemate over the question of whether to phase out or reduce fossil fuels. 

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Climate Analytics warns that if CCS underperforms, 86 billion metric tonnes of greenhouse gases will be released by 2050, while Oxford University has determined that a substantial buildout and use of this technology will cost the world $1 trillion a year. 

According to Oxford Net Zero executive director Steve Smith, the lack of urgency in decreasing emissions—2023 is going to set new heat and carbon pollution records—means no possibility should be discounted. 

Still, the conversations have inspired a glimmer of hope. Destination Zero executive director Catherine Abreu said, “In eight years of attending climate talks, I have never felt more that we were talking about what really matters.” She also stated that hearing ministers from around the world discuss the reality of phasing out fossil fuels was unimaginable two years ago. 

Mark your calendars and join us on May 15th-16th, 2024, in Glasgow as we unlock the potential of renewable and low carbon energy at All-Energy & Dcarbonise 

All-Energy/Dcarbonise 2024: Calls for Speakers and Academic Posters launched

All-Energy/Dcarbonise 2024: Calls for Speakers and Academic Posters launched

    All-Energy and Dcarbonise the central feature of Glasgow Climate Week
    Exhibition space selling well - floorplan 70% sold 
•    Themes for the main conference taking shape

The mood at All-Energy, the UK’s largest annual renewable and low carbon energy exhibition and conference and the co-located Dcarbonise is one of optimism. 70% of the exhibition space at Glasgow’s SEC has been reserved by past, and new, exhibitors. This year the two day event being held on 15 and 16 May will be right in the middle of the first Glasgow Climate Week with a programme of associated events around the City taking shape.

With under six months until the duo of shows opens a ‘Call’ has been published for two important component parts of the UK’s largest renewable and low carbon energy exhibition and conference.

The first is a Call for Speakers at www.all-energy.co.uk/Cfp24 for the ever-popular show floor theatres and the second is a Call for Academic Posters. The Call for Speakers embraces eight of the nine show floor theatres that focus on offshore wind, marine renewables, future talent, hydrogen and energy storage, community and local energy, innovation, and decarbonisation of the built environment decarbonisation, heat and transport. The ninth show floor theatre is the Research and Innovation (R&I) Hub organised by ETP which brings academic and industrial collaborative projects together by means of exhibits within pods and presentations in the R&I Hub theatre.

The Call for Academic Posters is also open and covers all topics that come under the banner of the All-Energy and Dcarbonise conference (see www.all-energy.co.uk/conference24).  Themes for the major conference are currently being developed and speakers invited, with announcements expected in January of the overall programme and many of the speakers who will be taking part.

Glasgow Climate Week is a COP26 legacy event and will now become an annual event. It was announced in late May by Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council who explained: “I’m delighted to say that next year – and we hope for several years after - we’ll be staging partner events around All-Energy, extending its reach into the city. Timed neatly midway between COPs, the new Glasgow Climate Week will be a staging post and focal point for our shared progress towards our net zero goals.”

“We are excited by the advent of the Glasgow Climate Week an auditorium in our main conference will focus on the topics under the Week’s spotlight. We are also very encouraged by the exceptional take up of exhibition space,” explained Jonathan Heastie, Portfolio Director Energy & Marine, RX Global who own and organise the duo of co-located events.

“Our online exhibitor list is – quite literally – an A-Z of a wide range of highly relevant organisations who will bring innovation to the show floor and enthuse our visitors, they include Centrica, Ecotricity, EDF Energy, Enercon, Nordex, North Sea Transition Authority,  Offshore Energies UK, RES, Siemens Energy, SSE, Statkraft and the University of Strathclyde.

“In 2023 we had total attendance of 9,706 – a 27% increase on the 2022 figure, over 250 exhibitors and over 9,200 badges were scanned as their wearers went into conference sessions and show floor theatres – it all adds to the sense of ‘buzzy-ness’ and of business being done which is the hallmark of the event.”

The Vital Role of EV Charging Infrastructure in Decarbonising the European Transport Sector

The Vital Role of EV Charging Infrastructure in Decarbonising the European Transport Sector

Key Highlights

  • From July 2022 to 2023, electric vehicle (EV) sales in Europe skyrocketed by 62%, while diesel sales dropped by 9%. This shift signals a significant move towards greener transportation choices.
  • Europe witnessed a remarkable 48% increase in public charging points in 2022. A new EU law mandates fast-charging stations every 60 kilometres on highways by 2025, addressing range anxiety and supporting long-distance EV travel.
  • Despite progress, an urban-rural charging infrastructure divide persists. Urban areas have a higher density of charging stations, while rural regions face scarcity, potentially impeding widespread EV adoption.
  • Experts recommend innovative funding models, including grants, subsidies, and private sector investment, to encourage private participation in EV charging infrastructure development.


In its relentless pursuit to be climate-neutral by 2050, Europe has taken significant strides in ushering in a new era of land transportation, with efforts focused on phasing out fossil fuel-based vehicles. This transition has led to the creation of a European Commission strategy document detailing measures towards a widespread adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), with targets aiming to have at least 30 million electric cars on the region’s roads by 2030. And this move, consequently, has called for the development of robust EV charging infrastructure across the continent.  

Europe’s Journey Towards Green Mobility

Given the pivotal role of EVs in the decarbonisation of the transport sector, it is no surprise to see a dramatic surge in EV adoption in Europe. Bloomberg reported that, over the past year leading to July 2023, EV sales in Europe rose by 62%, while diesel sales declined by 9%. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), Europe was the second-largest market for electric cars, with sales growing by over 15% in 2022, translating to more than one out of every five cars sold being an EV.  

With an increasing number of automakers unveiling countless new electric models, from compact cars to SUVs, consumers are presented with a wider range of sustainable options. Government incentives, coupled with growing consumer awareness of the environmental impact of traditional combustion engines, are also key in propelling the transition towards EVs. 

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The Current Landscape of EV Charging Infrastructure in Europe

A cornerstone of Europe’s electric mobility strategy lies in the development of an extensive network of public charging stations, especially since one of the aspects feared by EV sceptics is range anxiety—the fear of being unable to cover long distances without stopping to charge. Thankfully, as the region sees more electric cars hitting the roads, there has been a corresponding increase in public charging points. 

    In 2022 alone, the number of public charging points in the EU increased by 48% compared to 2021, underscoring the rapid pace of progress within the region.
    In July 2023, the European Union (EU) enacted a law requiring the installation of fast-charging stations at intervals of every 60 kilometres along highways by the year 2025. 
•    Another mandate of the aforementioned law is that the charging stations installed have to be interoperable, allowing them to be used by any EV, regardless of the manufacturer.  
    A promising option that is currently emerging within the region is the implementation of workplace charging within businesses. France and Nordic countries are leading the way in this, with their share of workplace charging at 60% combined.  

Addressing the Persisting Challenges

The development of EV charging infrastructure in Europe has made significant progress, but several hurdles persist.

Accessibility: Urban vs. Rural Dynamics

While Europe witnesses an encouraging surge in the number of public charging points, an inherent imbalance remains between urban and rural regions. Urban areas tend to be better equipped, boasting a higher concentration of charging stations, while rural regions often face a scarcity of options. This urban-rural divide in charging infrastructure accessibility poses a potential barrier to the seamless adoption of EVs, emphasising the need for a more comprehensive and inclusive approach. 

Charging Speed and Technology Standardisation

The lack of standardised charging technologies and varying charging speeds can create confusion and inconvenience for EV users. Different charging standards (e.g., CCS, CHAdeMO) and power levels can complicate the charging process. Inconsistency in charging infrastructure may deter potential EV buyers, as concerns about compatibility and charging times may arise. 

The adoption of advanced technologies, such as smarter and more efficient charging solutions, is recommended to enhance the efficiency and user experience of charging infrastructure. Standardisation of charging systems is also key to ensuring interoperability and ease of use. 

Investment, Funding, and Policy Support

Recognising the importance of EV charging infrastructure is growing, but securing adequate funding remains a challenge for governments and private entities. Balancing the need for extensive charging networks with budget allocations presents a practical hurdle across the European region. 

EY-Parthenon emphasised the role of collaboration between various stakeholders—including governments, businesses, and investors—to build an effective network of charging stations across the European region. An article by Energy5 also touches on the current funding landscape for EV infrastructure, including government grants and subsidies, private sector investment, business incentives, and more being implemented not just in Europe but also in economic giants such as China and the United States. Such innovative funding models and financial incentives are crucial to encouraging private investment in electric car charging infrastructure. 

The Road Ahead to Electrification 

Europe's journey towards climate neutrality is intricately linked to the evolution of its EV charging infrastructure. The continent's commitment to creating a comprehensive and accessible charging network is evident through the rapid increase in public charging points and the implementation of regulations to ensure uniformity.

Moving forward, addressing concerns about charging station accessibility, particularly in rural areas, will be crucial to realising Europe's vision of sustainable and inclusive electric mobility. With substantial investments on the horizon and collaborative efforts driving innovation, the region is well-positioned to lead the global transition towards cleaner and greener land transportation.

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